Working with Sugar

I’m putting together some notes related to using sugar in beer, specifically for making Belgian candi sugar, candied ginger and other things…

 

Useful links:

https://joshthebrewmaster.wordpress.com/2010/11/27/how-to-make-belgian-candi-sugar/

http://www.franklinbrew.org/wp/?page_id=391

http://www.chefeddy.com/2009/11/invert-sugar/

http://nateobrew.blogspot.com/2011/08/candi-syrup-secrets-and-how-to-make.html

 

Ginger:

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2008/12/candied-ginger/

http://www.daringgourmet.com/2015/06/05/how-to-make-crystallized-ginger/

 

 

Belgian candi sugar follow-up:

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/Homebrewing/comments/4kpdzy/this_weekend_we_tried_first_attempt_at_belgian/

https://www.reddit.com/r/Homebrewing/comments/462sew/heres_a_video_on_how_i_make_belgian_candi_sugar

https://www.reddit.com/r/Homebrewing/comments/401l56/failure_at_candi

 

 

Some temporary notes while researching inversion and hydrolysis of sucrose:

 

237 for 20 minutes to invert the sugar

add the cream of tartar, bring to 260

add the DAP, boil 260-275 for 20 mins
maintain the 260-275 range for the entire boil
only raise to 300 at end to reach hard crack stage
never go about 305 (avoid 320)
avoiding caramelization
fructose, 110C / 230F
glucose, 160C / 320F
sucrose, 160C / 320F
cane sugar (sucrose) inverts and becomes glucose/fructose
at 237, the fructose will caramelize, the glucose won’t
glycolysis is turning fructose into glucose

http://www.colby.edu/chemistry/PChem/lab/InversionSucrose.pdf

https://books.google.com/books?id=MslAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA132&lpg=PA132&dq=cane+sugar+hydrolysis+instructions&source=bl&ots=V7ZDdOVLpb&sig=MhLDGyH28SwkzZmoDRj6XabhSlA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiEsJja7PLMAhXB7yYKHW2EBMIQ6AEIIjAB#v=onepage&q=cane%20sugar%20hydrolysis%20instructions&f=false

hydrolysis 100C-128C / 212-262F
2-6% nitric acid, 0-300 minutes
xylose, glucose, arabinose + acetic acid, furfural
hydrolysis
0.3mol cane sugar, 0.1mol HCl, 1000g water
118.4F, for 20 minutes, 32% of sugar is hydrolyzed
40-45C / 104-113F to avoid HMF production (hydroxy-mehtyl-furfural) associated with color formation